How to Play Urban Golf Continued

Urban Golf Continued…

I realized my last post was a little unfinished so here is the rest of how to play this great game!

Step 5: Pick your target “holes”. You’re going to need to know what you’re aiming for and this should be decided by all players. The holes can be something as simple as just hitting the side of a garbage can, tree, rolling over a manhole, or rolling under a car. Any round ball will roll a long way on pavement or asphalt. It’s going to take some getting used to.

Space the areas far apart so that there is ample hitting space and it’s reasonably difficult to get a “hole-in-one”. The size of a standard city block works well as an idea for measurement.

Choose any amount of holes that suits your needs; around 9 target holes makes for an even and fun pace.

You can also pick spots as you go, especially if you’re keen to keep on the move rather than to remain in one area.

Make sure everyone in your group is in agreement as to what the holes and course consist of before play commences.

Step 6: Commence play. While there are no hard and fast rules, there are some basic guidelines to put into action so that the play is enjoyable and action-packed. Here are some suggestions (and you’re perfectly entitled to change any of them as long as you keep within The Golden Rules):[3]

Select the holes as suggested earlier. Aim for the target hole and hit the tennis ball toward it. (by the way the best place to buy tennis balls is here)

Take turns in hitting the ball toward the target hole. After the first tee-off, the player with the ball furthest away from the target hits next.

A successful hit for a large hole is where the ball hits the target or passes through, under or in it. The larger the hole, the more accuracy required. If it’s easy to hit, don’t allow for “near enough” hits; make sure they’re exact! For example, hitting dumpsters, trucks, and storage sheds means actually hitting them, not rolling close by.

A successful hit for a small or narrow hole is where the ball passes within a 3 foot (0.9 m) radius or 1 club length of the small target hole. For example, fire hydrants, manholes, poles, and mailboxes are harder to hit.

Award points. Each normal stroke is one point and a ball has to travel a few feet to be called a stroke. Loss of the ball counts as a 3 point penalty.

Step 7: Resolve what to do about stuck and lost balls. Stuck and lost balls have the ability to slow down play and make things tedious. The following suggestions will help keep the game flowing fast:

Limit the search time for lost balls. This will keep the game moving well.

If the ball ends up in a pothole, or somewhere else challenging, each player is allowed to move the ball one club length in any direction to make it easier to make the next hit. The idea behind this is not to hold up the game.

Replace a lost ball by a new ball in the place where the other ball went out of bounds. Finding the lost ball means that you can remove 1.5 points from your score.

If the ball lands anywhere that could cause damage, the ball must be moved at least 3 club lengths away, or more if needed to avoid harm.

Step 8 Perfect your shot. Remembering that the aim of the game is to have fun, not be competitive, and to revel in your inability, there is one thing you can do to help yourself keep the game moving. Basically, try to keep your ball low to the ground. High flying balls are more easily lost and have poorly controlled trajectories that could hit something you don’t want hit, resulting in damage.

(Special thanks to for inspiration to the article. Further special thanks goes to Derek Abello (Phoenix SEO), but he finally managed to join us for a game and even brought the beer. Didn’t I mention that in step 2? Gathering supplies? Beer is optional but some say it improves their swing! Hope you enjoyed these posts…now get yourself a game together and go have some fun!)

How to play Cross Golf

Urban Golf (or Cross Golf) is the new coolest game around. It takes everything great about golf and eliminates all the lame aspects. Like what college kids can regularly afford green fees? Or maybe you live too far from one? Or what about the environment? Isn’t it annoying to see precious land turned into a golf course. Or tired of the stuck up type atmosphere that goes along with golf. Polo shirts? Please.
Time to have some fun in the city. Urban golf is the answer you’re looking for. It’s a game of golf unrestricted by the usual rules of golf, and the best part is you can play it anywhere there is free space (and…hopefully not too many people around….that could be dangerous!)

So here are the 8 simple steps to getting your game on. We’ll cover the first 4 in this post and then the next 4 in the following post.

Step 1:

The rules for Urban Golf are there are NO rules! (Oh wait…maybe that was Fight Club 😉 ) But seriously, the rules for urban golf aren’t like they are set in stone and you can certainly modify them as you wish.

But I would say there are a few that are “Golden” and you should follow these:
Show some respect – Don’t play where it harms people (or their land/property). Don’t get yourself in a position where the cops are called or your asked to move away by residents or police. Don’t ruin it for those who want to play it right!
There’s no trophy – It’s not about being competitive! Go play real golf if you need that kind of pressure! If it becomes super competitive then your not playing urban golf!
Make it fun! Don’t be a control freak – No one’s in charge who insists how the game is to be played. Everyone should have a say in the way the game goes.

Step 2:

Gather Supplies!
Nothing out of the ordinary–don’t over think this step. Get a backpack or just carry your club. If you have a golf caddy fine but not essential! You’ll need:
A golf club. A cheap “Wal-Mart” club or goodwill club will do. As long as you can hit the ball with it, it’s good enough for urban golf!
A few balls. Believe it or not, racket balls or tennis balls are the most effective and traditional for urban golf (and should they hit something, in an urban setting, they’ll do a lot less damage than a real golf ball).
If you are a better player (or just really want to), there are off-course golf balls and they won’t break windows or dent cars that are new to the game. Callaway makes a mediocre one, but the best is an almost golf ball. They fly true and out perform racket balls and tennis balls. TIP: Mark your ball so you know which is yours! Have a few extras, in case some end up down a drain pipe or somewhere else you can’t retrieve them from. It’s a good idea to have at least three balls per player.
Make or download a scorecard. To keep scores, either write down the scores as you go on a piece of paper, or use a prepared score sheet. Each player is responsible for keeping a tally of his or her scores; or, ask a player good with numbers to keep the tally. Just be honest! If you are feeling competitive re-read step 1!
Pack snacks and drinks. What’s a fun get together without drinks and food?

Step 3:

Get the players together.
Small is better, 10-12 players or less. Large groups become hard to manage, slow down the progress of the game, and can attract negative attention if things get too rowdy or out of hand. Although I should say it is nice to have a few spectators who watch and carry the bags! As long as everyone has fun and it doesn’t get out of hand, spectators are fine!

Step 4:

This is my favorite part! As I drive around I’m always keeping in mind good places I see. Alleys, streets in an industrial section of town, the green areas of a city park, anywhere can be game! Just remember to make sure the area is not too crowded when you want to play; the tradition is to try to avoid most residential areas unless your play won’t annoy residents.
Industrial or business areas can be great on weekends when the workers aren’t around and the place is deserted.

(Special thanks to for inspiration to the article. Further special thanks goes to Derek Abello he normally is too busy to golf because he runs a Scottsdale SEO company, but he finally managed to join us for a game and even brought the beer. Didn’t I mention that in step 2? Gathering supplies? Beer is optional but some say it improves their swing!)

The History of Cross Golf and how to grow it in the US

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Urban golf is a game (or cross golf as it is better known in the USA), comes from the original game of golf, where players or teams hit a ball into a hole or at a specified target using different kinds of clubs.

Urban golf/cross golf is currently becoming popular across the world in many varying formats. No one really knows where or how it came about but is believed to be started in Scotland in 1741 outside The White Hart Inn in the Grassmarket area of Edinburgh by a man named Duncan Thomas.

Some people might call this sport a destructive past time but here at cross golf we just call it a “hole” lot of fun! (Ok…that was bad I know!) There are now many organizations across the world participating in cross golf.

(From Wickipedia) “Shoreditch Golf Club formed the first 18 hole, par 72 open tournament in London in 2004. Since 2004 Le 19ème Trou (The 19th Hole) From France organizes many events and was the first team to organize a national championship (The French City Pro tour). NW Urban Sports out of Portland Oregon helped start World Urban Golf Day in 2007 in association with Urban Golf Australia and currently in Portland, Oregon, USA. Previously out of Oakland, California, USA the Urban Golf Associations Bi-Annual Charles Bukowski North Beach Invitational in San Francisco predate this by a few years with a smaller format.
Other urban golf associations are springing up from New Zealand to Russia to Argentina, and are listed below. Unlike these organizations, which use public city areas, Cross Golf, a variation on Urban Golf, exists in the form of Natural Born Golfers from Germany and Urban Golf Unit from The Netherlands.”

The real difference between Cross Golf and Urban Golf is that Cross Golf uses unused city areas like building sites, rooftops, canals, hotel lobbies, school campus sites, and industrial areas as courses.

So for us in the great country of the U S of A, we typically play cross golf on grass, anywhere in rural and suburban areas. Where we DON’T play is on golf courses! Cross golf courses are usually built around college campus and playing fields, parks, backyards, hay fields, and campgrounds. In general, any piece of private property can be used as a cross golf game (hopefully the owner is agreeable to the construction of a temporary course but I have to say I have participated in a few rounds where they didn’t know!).

If you live in the U.S. or are planning on taking a visit and want to check out some hot Cross Golf sites your best bet is Cooper’s Lake in Slippery Rock, PA and “The Links” at Thistledown in Campbelltown, PA. These 2 are the main venues for cross golf in the US. Both sites have been hosting competitive tournaments for a few years now as cross golf is gaining popularity in the US. The Links at Thistledown established a summer league just last year. Cooper’s Lake hosts two tournaments every year and they are called “The Cooper’s Lake Open” and “The Cooper’s Lake Championship.” They are considered to be the unofficial major championships of urban golf and cross golf. Mainly because they attract high-profile players, trophies and prize money. The courses are always extremely challenging layouts and they really test your game.

My hope with this website is that we can continue to grow the great sport of cross golf and I think a lot of that is going to be through the internet. Most cross golfers have access to the internet and use it frequently to promote their sport. You’ll find lots of videos on youtube For those who are unsure how to promote their websites or youtube channels I highly recommend hiring a pro to get your started. There are lots of internet geniuses out there. I personally know and use

Too hot to play golf

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Have fun

It is definitely an interesting topic as I play, live, and enjoy playing golf in Arizona.  The only issue I find is…it is just too hot in the summer!  I thoroughly enjoy being a snowbird and when I leave the beautiful state in the hellish months of June-September I miss my game.  That is why I took to the awesome sport Cross Golf.  Come on, if you can’t already tell I made a website around this sport and it is awesome. That being said again, I have come to know how to play this sport all over the beautiful countryside of the United States, from Seattle Washington, to Helena Montana, the cool of the Northern states affords me the pleasure of golfing year round.  So my encouragement to you today?  Get out and golf! Too hot where you live? Almost anyone in the U.S. is just a few hours away from cooler weather.  So what are you waiting for?  Call your college buddies up and make a road trip with some beers and some clubs and get your cross golf game on!